For centuries women have used cloth as a tool of comfort and as an expression of beauty within their homes. Creating cloth for warmth, cloth for shelter, our female predecessors embellished these linens with hand stitch using laborious and time consuming techniques thereby enhancing the functional beauty of objects which enveloped and protected their families. Inspired by these women I hope my creations pay tribute to and recognise the devotion expressed in cloth by our female ancestors .







''the use of traditional often time consuming process alludes to the devotion of a mother''. c K. A. Ruane 2007







Wednesday, January 5, 2011

now you know why I embroider.....

First things first, I would like my bravery to be acknowledged. Never before have I posted something that has disappointed me so much. I did warn you, you can't say I didn't. From a distance, in dim lighting, without spectacles, this is almost passable. I will admit that it's not the worst artwork I have ever seen but....and it's a big but. I don't like it. I am not happy with it. It isn't how I imagined. I have however bit the bullet and it is now out there in the public domain. The reason? To spur me on, to make sure I don't give up. To keep going until I'm satisfied...it could be a long trip....
I suppose it's more''doodling'' than drawing. No colour doesn't help, that is noted and won't happen again. I also think my inspiration images weren't as inspiring as I had hoped. So I have learn't a lot, that's a positive. The marks I have made are mostly supposed to mirror patterns found on lace, (just incase you were wondering)
Today I have gathered more images, different images and I will work from those. I will try again. It can't get any worse can it. I am not by nature an instinctive ''drawer'' in the sense of picking up a pencil, my instinct is the needle but I have such a desire to feel confident with a pencil or paint brush. When I was studying I made big leaps with it, doing it every day definitely helped so I am going to continue for a while. They say practice makes perfect. I will be happy if practice makes ''satisfied''.

20 comments:

jennyflower said...

I really like the way your marks work with and around the sources. I too have done some pencil work this year- mine's very stilted and uptight but I'm going to try to make it a weekly habit, at least. Looking forward to see your next foray. x

Dolores said...

First off, I must say that you are brave to show something which you are not overly fond of - don't think I could do that. Secondly, I don't think it's that bad but I am not you. I like the lace and the 'doodles.'

Miss 376 said...

If I could produce something like that I would be ecstatic. It will be valuable in that you have learned something which you take forward and develop. I enjoyed looking at it

Elizabeth said...

Just have one problem with your post and that is that I don't have the picture you imagined in your head. What I liked about is how you doodled and embroidered little pieces for an imaginary dress. As far as I know that is a new idea. Therefore keep on trying so the picture in your head becomes a reality.

Francesca Young said...

It looks pretty good from here! I'm assuming it's a sketchbook work and not a 'finished' work of art? If so it's spot on for what I think a working sketchbook should contain.

I don't think the lack of colour is a problem. What I would suggest is that you try drawing in pen. Speaking from my own experience, if you're not confident drawing it's tempting to stick with 'safe' pencil (because you can erase it) but you end up with a grey, wishy-washy piece of work and a vague feeling of dissatisfaction but not knowing why. Draw in pen (or at least start by drawing in pen over the pencil lines and then erasing them) and you'll have something that looks more solid and substantial. (I love Staedtler pigment liner pens: black waterproof ink in 9 widths. The narrowest ones (0.1mm and 0.05mm) are great if you like delicate outline drawings - lightly sketch with pencil first, go over the lines with the pen, then erase the pencil and you have a lovely ink drawing.)

And of course you could try combining threads into your line drawings: glueing a thick thread (eg cotton perle) around some of the motifs, or piercing holes in the paper and embroidering onto it. Fiddly but a nice way to combine stitch and drawing. Play around and have fun!

karen said...

thanks to all of you, I am trying something else tonight and Francesca, it is sketchbook work, thanks so much for the input.

stitchinglife2 said...

You're so hard on yourself!
I think it's delightful.

hkpowerstudio said...

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. The whole point of each piece of art that we create is to learn from our practice and to evolve and get ever closer and closer to what is in out mind's eye. You are on that path so please do not begrudge your practiced efforts and results. They are beauty!

jill said...

I think they are great, stop dissing your sketches. Ordinary ballpoint pen is also good, nothing fancy just a pen.

Joanna said...

I know what you mean about being more instinctive with the needle, I'm the same and would rather pick up the needle and just start to sew.

I can see what folks mean by using a pen, I think that really would work much better. I have a book of paper and I keep meaning to sit down and start drawing to practice.

Sheep Rustler said...

It looks pretty good to me! I am also not a 'drawer' but I would be pretty pleased with this. I love the line 'practice makes satisfied'. I might steal that one!

We aren't anywhere near the floods, thank you for asking :) We are in the south. But apparently there is an area under water in the north that is the size of France and Germany combined, or something like that.

I am slowly - very slowly - packing up my craft supplies and organising them. It is irritating and exhausting but I know that it will be worth it in six months time when I can find everything!

Suztats said...

Keep on doing, Karen, as that leads to better results of creating what's in your mind's eye. Be bold. I understand the needle vs the pencil, as I am the brush vs the pencil. I paint better than I draw, which is weird. My art never evolved as I envisioned until I spent a year painting every day. Best wishes

Joei Rhode Island said...

Sketching and doodling are not 'fine art' but the precursor to where you want to go. Practice helps you find a path. Keep going!

sylviesgarden said...

I think your sketches are great and that you should stop putting yourself down! You should definitely keep going.
x

vintagerockchick said...

Don't be so hard on yourself Karen - it looks wonderful to me. Admittedly, I don't have my contact lenses in ...
Only joking - it's lovely. Join in with the Sketchbook Challenge and draw everyday! Gill x

Carrie said...

I've just discovered your blog and I think your embroidery is stunning. I agree with Francesca Young, drawing in pen is great.

helena frontini said...

I don't understand what you'r saying, because I love it, I SAID I LOOOOOVE IT!"!!
Kisses.

Magpie's Mumblings said...

Well my friend, I have to say that if I could draw/doodle that well I would be in seventh heaven. You are altogether too hard on yourself! Keeping your drawings will someday spark an idea that you will be able to translate into needle and thread, but in the meantime don't give up.

rbickel006 said...

You're crazy. This is beautiful and will lead to other things. It's a great start.

I love your embroidery -- I also draw AND sew so am very interested to see others doing it, too. I go back and forth between drawing in pencil and pastel and embroidery. I love the interaction! I think it's a wonderful relationship--so happy to see others doing it.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/39789991@N06/

Rachel said...

Karen, sometimes you amaze me! I thought these looked lovely and here you are talking about the bin...?